Accessing STATUS columns efficiently

A frequently reoccuring design problem with relational databases is the issue locating unprocessed rows in a large table, so we know which rows of data are still yet to be processed.

The problem with a STATUS column is that it generally has low cardinality; there are probably only a handful of distinct values [(C)omplete, (E)rror, (U)nprocessed or something like that]. Most records will be (C)omplete. This makes STATUS a poor candidate for standard B-Tree indexation. In a high throughput OLTP database, using bitmap indexes is probably not an option due to concurrency.

[Aside: When coding flag columns in Oracle, ALWAYS use a VARCHAR2(1 CHAR) {or CHAR(1 CHAR) if you prefer, but a CHAR is a VARCHAR2 under the covers and occupies the same number of bytes}. This is in preferance to a NUMBER(1). which occupies more bytes for a “1” than a “0”, so when you update it, you run the risk of row migration, chained rows and a performance hit. Frequently, ORM’s like Hibernate code for NUMBER by default. Override this!]

So what are my options? There’s a short list of possible table accesses for a low cardinality column.

1. Table scan. In an OLTP database where you only want a tiny fraction of the rows in the table, this would be a bad chouce.
2. Index the accessed columns and accept the inevitable INDEX_SCAN or FAST_FULL_INDEX_SCAN. This is not great and you probably need a Histogram on the column to convince the optimizer to use the index for your low frequency values. Otherwise you may be back to the table scan.
3. Make the “Complete” status “NULL”.
4. Uses a function-based index which makes the Complete status seems to be NULL for a specific query.

So what’s with options 3 and 4, why are they good, and how do we use them?

Unlike some RBDMS’s, Oracle does not store NULL values in it’s simple (non-composite) b-tree indexes. Therefore, if you choose Option (3) and make your “Complete” status be represented by a NULL, you will maintain an index on STATUS in which the only values that are stored are values you are interested in. This makes the index very sexy to the optimizer as it will generally be very tiny. However, we face one small problem. Convincing Developers that having a NULL as a valid status can be difficult. A NULL is a non-representative value. It is not supposed to represent anything. It means “I don’t know”. It doesn’t behave the same an normal values. This tends to freak out Developers and designers sometimes.

That’s where Option 4 comes in. If we wrap the index definition in a CASE statement, to produce a function-based index, we have have a highly specific tailored index on our table. If the SQL predicate matches the query exactly, we get a serious performance payoff.

But don’t take my word for it. Here’s a worked example from my laptop:

 
Here’s the table, it’s data distribution (16m rows, and a handful we care about)

NEIL @ ORCL01 > desc test_table
 Name                          Null?    Type
 ----------------------------- -------- --------------------
 ID                            NOT NULL NUMBER
 STATUS                        NOT NULL VARCHAR2(1 CHAR)
 DESCRIPTION                   NOT NULL VARCHAR2(100 CHAR)

NEIL @ ORCL01 > select status,count(*) from test_table group by status

S   COUNT(*)
- ----------
E         16
C   16777216
Y         32

 
Here are the indexes on the table, and their sizes. As you can see, the function-based index is absolutely tiny, making it as attractive to storage admins as it is to the optimizer.

- alter table test_table add constraint test_table_pk primary key (id);
- create index test_table_CASE on test_table (case status when 'Y' then status else null end);
- create index test_table_COVER_COMP on test_table (status, id) compress 1;
- create index test_table_STATUS on test_table (status) compress 1;



NEIL @ ORCL01 > select segment_name,segment_type,sum(bytes/1024) kb from user_extents 
where segment_name like 'TEST_TABLE%' 
group by segment_type,segment_name order by 2 desc,1;

SEGMENT_NAME               SEGMENT_TYPE               KB
-------------------------- ------------------ ----------
TEST_TABLE                 TABLE                  555008
TEST_TABLE_CASE            INDEX                      64
TEST_TABLE_COVER_COMP      INDEX                  658432
TEST_TABLE_PK              INDEX                  319488
TEST_TABLE_STATUS          INDEX                  413696

Some Index stats:
INDEX_NAME                DISTINCT_KEYS AVG_LEAF_BLOCKS_PER_KEY AVG_DATA_BLOCKS_PER_KEY CLUSTERING_FACTOR STATUS     NUM_ROWS SAMPLE_SIZE LAST_ANAL
------------------------- ------------- ----------------------- ----------------------- ----------------- -------- ---------- ----------- ---------
TEST_TABLE_CASE                       1                       1                       6                 6 VALID            32          32 21-FEB-16
TEST_TABLE_COVER_COMP          16748149                       1                       1            125447 VALID      16748149      234974 21-FEB-16
TEST_TABLE_PK                  17003239                       1                       1             91391 VALID      17003239      492287 21-FEB-16
TEST_TABLE_STATUS                     3                   13828                   32011             96034 VALID      16257590      363295 21-FEB-16

 
Where we have a choice of useful indexes, we get a FAST FULL SCAN with a hefty cost. A histogram could have given us an index RANGE SCAN, which can be very good.
With no Histogram:

select id from test_table where status = 'Y';

Plan hash value: 1140618830

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation            | Name                  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT     |                       |       |       | 18753 (100)|          |
|*  1 |  INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| TEST_TABLE_COVER_COMP |  5592K|    42M| 18753   (1)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
With a histogram in place on STATUS, you get a much better plan as the covering index avoids the need for the table look-up. You also get the risk that the optimizer may have bind variable peeking issues and other complications should we have lots of table joins.

select id from test_table where status = 'Y'

Plan hash value: 2912582684

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation        | Name                  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT |                       |       |       |     3 (100)|          |
|*  1 |  INDEX RANGE SCAN| TEST_TABLE_COVER_COMP |    32 |   256 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTE: Ditching the covering index and just using the index on STATUS is pretty efficient too when combined with a histogram:

select id from test_table where status = 'Y'

Plan hash value: 2416598805

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                           | Name              | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                    |                   |       |       |     4 (100)|          |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| TEST_TABLE        |    32 |   256 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN                  | TEST_TABLE_STATUS |    32 |       |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
And now with the function-based index; having the case statement removing all statuses we are not interested-in for a tiny tidy index.

NOTE: The Predicate in the query must EXACTLY match the function-based index for it to be used.

select id from test_table where case status when 'Y' then status else null end = 'Y'

Plan hash value: 2073004851

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                           | Name            | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                    |                 |       |       |     7 (100)|          |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| TEST_TABLE      |    32 |   256 |     7   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN                  | TEST_TABLE_CASE |    32 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conclusion: For a highly skewed STATUS column you need a histogram, which is something you should mostly avoid in OLTP systems using BIND variables. Having a highly focussed function-based index allows for a tiny self-maintaining index which is guaranteed to only be used for queries that you want it to be used for.
 

NOTE: The original idea behind using NULLS to minimise index size came from the performance expert, Jonathan Lewis. I have implemented both NULL-as-complete design and case-based indexes at several clients, in varying forms, and always to great success.

4 Responses to Accessing STATUS columns efficiently

  1. Dom Brooks says:

    Option 5: Partition by status column
    See comments/discussions:
    https://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2013/11/08/row-movement/

    • Indeed, a valid option that I missed – but one that has other costs, both financial (it’s an additional cost option) plus the additional insert/delete activity caused by updating the status.

      You may also have other plans for your partitioning which negate the use of partitioning by status.

  2. Sentinel says:

    Option 6: Indexed Virtual Column

    alter table Test_Table add (status_ind as ( case when status != ‘C’ then status end ) virtual);
    create index test_table_STATUS_ind on test_table (status_ind);

    By using a virtual column you don’t have to worry about getting the function just right in your predicate in order to use the function based index. You could also create more focused virtual columns like the function based you used:

    alter table Test_Table add (status_Y as ( case when status = ‘Y’ then status end ) virtual);
    create index test_table_STATUS_Y on test_table (status_Y);

    but the more general one above is likely sufficient and provides access to all non complete records instead of just the ones with a specific status.

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