Exposing the Oracle Alert Log to SQL

I’ve been spending some time working in Apex recently, building a small app to draw together the monitoring of application and infrastructure components into a single easy-to-visualise tool. As part of that, I wanted to be able to read and report on the alert log. Traditionally, that would have meant creating an external table to point to the alert log and reading it that way, with lots of string manipulation and regular expressions to try to pull out useful bits of information. However, Oracle 11G had made that a lot easier. Step forward X$DBGALERTEXT. This is the decoded version of the XML version of the Alert log, and as such provides lots of lovely columns to filter by, rather than a single line of text to decode. Particularly useful (for me) is the MESSAGE_LEVEL. Is this line of text informational (16), or critical (1), or something in between? Of course, each “normal” line of text is still available in the MESSAGE_TEXT column.

SQL> desc x$dbgalertext;
 Name                           Type
 ------------------------------ --------------------------------------------------------
 ADDR                           RAW(4)
 INDX                           NUMBER
 INST_ID                        NUMBER
 ORIGINATING_TIMESTAMP          TIMESTAMP(3) WITH TIME ZONE
 NORMALIZED_TIMESTAMP           TIMESTAMP(3) WITH TIME ZONE
 ORGANIZATION_ID                VARCHAR2(64)
 COMPONENT_ID                   VARCHAR2(64)
 HOST_ID                        VARCHAR2(64)
 HOST_ADDRESS                   VARCHAR2(46)
 MESSAGE_TYPE                   NUMBER
 MESSAGE_LEVEL                  NUMBER
 MESSAGE_ID                     VARCHAR2(64)
 MESSAGE_GROUP                  VARCHAR2(64)
 CLIENT_ID                      VARCHAR2(64)
 MODULE_ID                      VARCHAR2(64)
 PROCESS_ID                     VARCHAR2(32)
 THREAD_ID                      VARCHAR2(64)
 USER_ID                        VARCHAR2(64)
 INSTANCE_ID                    VARCHAR2(64)
 DETAILED_LOCATION              VARCHAR2(160)
 PROBLEM_KEY                    VARCHAR2(64)
 UPSTREAM_COMP_ID               VARCHAR2(100)
 DOWNSTREAM_COMP_ID             VARCHAR2(100)
 EXECUTION_CONTEXT_ID           VARCHAR2(100)
 EXECUTION_CONTEXT_SEQUENCE     NUMBER
 ERROR_INSTANCE_ID              NUMBER
 ERROR_INSTANCE_SEQUENCE        NUMBER
 VERSION                        NUMBER
 MESSAGE_TEXT                   VARCHAR2(2048)
 MESSAGE_ARGUMENTS              VARCHAR2(128)
 SUPPLEMENTAL_ATTRIBUTES        VARCHAR2(128)
 SUPPLEMENTAL_DETAILS           VARCHAR2(128)
 PARTITION                      NUMBER
 RECORD_ID                      NUMBER

Very handy. Just add your own view, synonym and permissions to read the view, and you’re away…

create view v_$alert_log as select * from x$dbgalertext;
create public synonym v$alert_log for sys.v_$alert_log;
grant select on v$alert_log to whomever...

  1* select message_text from v$alert_log where ...;

MESSAGE_TEXT
-----------------------------------------------------------------
LICENSE_MAX_SESSION = 0
LICENSE_SESSIONS_WARNING = 0
Shared memory segment for instance monitoring created
Picked latch-free SCN scheme 2
Autotune of undo retention is turned on.
LICENSE_MAX_USERS = 0
SYS auditing is disabled
Starting up:
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options.

Using parameter settings in server-side pfile /home/oracle/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_2/dbs/initorcl.ora
System parameters with non-default values:
  processes                = 200
  sessions                 = 322
  sga_max_size             = 2G
  pre_page_sga             = TRUE
  nls_language             = "ENGLISH"
  nls_territory            = "UNITED KINGDOM"
  filesystemio_options     = "SetAll"
  sga_target               = 2G
  control_files            = "/u02/oradata/orcl/control01.ctl"
.
[snip]
.
  aq_tm_processes          = 1
  diagnostic_dest          = "/u20/apps/oracle"
PMON started with pid=2, OS id=2492
PSP0 started with pid=3, OS id=2494
VKTM started with pid=4, OS id=2512 at elevated priority
VKTM running at (1)millisec precision with DBRM quantum (100)ms
GEN0 started with pid=5, OS id=2520
DIAG started with pid=6, OS id=2522
...etc...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: